Pants on Fire

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I still can’t hear the word liar without hearing the rest of the rhyme:

Liar, liar. Pants on fire. Nose as long as a telephone wire.

Proof that making something rhyme gives it staying power – possibly undeserved.

I don’t use the word much. Don’t even hear the word much. So when it shows up in Scripture five times in the petite book of 1 John, it grabs my attention. I’m listening.

li-ar (n): a person who has lied or lies repeatedly. Synonyms include: deceiver, trickster, cheat, beguiler, fibber, storyteller.

Anyone come to mind?

In the world you and I live in, lying is fairly commonplace.

We struggle with ways to get our kids to tell the truth, and we wonder how we’ll know if they don’t.

We fail to tell the whole truth sometimes, hoping that a partial lie (or incomplete truth) will pass for the real thing in a pinch.

We weigh the value of a relationship before deciding whether this one is deserving of the facts, or just a camouflaged version of the truth.

We’d like to think we’re fairly wise in how we present ourselves, but we’re always open to the possibility of an aesthetic touch-up here or strategic adjustment there, to insure that we’ve put our best foot forward.

What we fail to acknowledge is that manipulation of the truth in any way, shape or form is actually a lie.

Apparently John had witnessed, on more than one occasion, behavior that warranted the use of this strong, descriptive word: liar. The Greek language definition of the word, which reflects John’s objections to its appearance in the church, is slightly different than the English dictionary version printed above:

Liar: One who breaks faith. A false and faithless man. To lie, to speak deliberate falsehoods. To deceive one by a lie, to lie to.

I may not think of myself as a liar, but have I ever broken faith?

Surely I’m not a trickster, but is there anything about my persona that could be considered false? A misrepresentation of who I am or what I believe?

Sometimes I tell a fib or two, but does that make me faithless?

I might use artistic license at times, but it’s not like I’m deliberately misleading others!

“Deceiver” is a name given to the evil one – God’s enemy. Not to people like ME!

What was John thinking when he offered up this four-letter word?

I Am A “C”

I am a “C H.” I am a “C H R I S T I A N.” Which implies, I belong to Christ. I follow Christ. I am His. Yet my claims of belonging to the family of Christ ring hollow and tinny when my life itself fails to confirm it.

“If someone says, “I belong to God,” but doesn’t obey God’s commandments, that person is a liar and does not live in the truth.” I John 2:4 (NLT)

We are liars in the eyes of God when we confess Him with our lips and deny Him with our lives. When the life I live is a misrepresentation of the One I’m living for, and still I claim to be a member of the Body of Christ, I’m fooling myself.

One of John’s names was John the Evangelist. If he was known as such, he must have spent years of his life proclaiming the Name of Jesus and lifting up the Gospel of grace before those who were hungry for a bit of good news. John knew that it was as important to preach without words – through a life lived authentically for the glory of God – as it was to speak the Message in audible ways. Actions speak louder than words, you know. John knew it, too.

And just in case we forget or begin to think that we’re somehow exempt from this truth, John is here to remind us that words are not enough for a watching world to be convinced. They’ve got to see it to believe it.

I Love You, Lord

“And I lift my voice to worship You, oh my soul rejoice! Take joy, my King, in what You hear; may it be a sweet, sweet sound in Your ear.” (Lyrics by Laurie Klein)

We sing the songs on Sunday morning. We pray the prayers that express in words the love we believe we have toward God. And we just can’t stand that annoying person sitting in the pew behind us.

“If someone says, “I love God,” but hates a Christian brother or sister, that person is a liar; for if we don’t love people we can see, how can we love God, whom we have not seen?” I John 4:20 (NLT)

John uses this word liar to describe someone who claims to love God but fails to extend that love to people. I wonder if it’s just that we’re… confused. It’s not difficult to see how we might have become confused – after all, love in our culture is best described as the warm, fuzzy feeling that wells up in our hearts when we think about someone who is special to us – right? If we claim to have the warm fuzzies for God, surely we can muster up a tepid fleece for those who worship with us, right?

Unfortunately for us, it’s going to take more than a feeling to qualify as a lover in the Kingdom of God.

In God’s world, love is an action. Love is a lifestyle. Love is a choice.

We can’t love outside of relationship, which means that we must be in relationship with the people of God in order to truly be in relationship with God Himself. Only through the act of loving real people can we even come close to knowing how to love the God who made them in His image.

Loving God is the result of loving those who bear His likeness and are known by His Name; not the other way around.

Denial… That’s a River in Egypt, Right?

I know – it’s tempting to play dumb. That must be why John was driven to use such hard words to drive home such a critical point to those who filled the worship centers of his day.

“And who is the great liar? The one who says that Jesus is not the Christ. Such people are antichrists, for they have denied the Father and the Son.” 1 John 2:22 (NLT)

When it comes right down to it, I wonder how many people actually deny that Jesus is the Christ. Think about it with me. ANTICHRISTS. That’s quite an accusation. How many people in our communities today would explicitly deny the Lordship of God? If they were totally honest? If they were asked?

I don’t think we’ll ever know unless we, like John the Evangelizer, wander out of our Christian bubbles of comfort and safety and start asking the questions that beg our attention.

Sure, there are great liars out there. But not so many, I suspect, as we might think.

There are those whose god is themselves.

There are those whose god is their appetites and passions.

But there are also those who are just waiting to be approached.

To be looked at. To be asked. To be loved.

To belong.

With hearts (not pants) on fire, may we demonstrate today that we are lovers, not liars.

(And spread the news from the telephone wires!)

A New Day, A New Dare (a PINK Tuesday post)

English: graphic convention of manga, sweating...

Do you remember playing Truth or Dare as a child? Usually the DARE was something RISKY – maybe EMBARRASSING or even SCARY – something that would push you out of your comfort zone. Maybe even make you feel a bit vulnerable in front of others.

Personally, I almost always took the TRUTH option.

The word DARE implies that this is something not everyone can or will do. To take a DARE is to take a risk – it COSTS me something in the end. A DARE is not without consequences.

Back in grade school, a typical dare would be something like this:

I dare you to call Jimmy’s house and hang up!

I dare you to run outside in your pajamas (or less, depending on how daring your circle of friends happened to be)!

The truth is, Truth was generally not as fun for the group as the Dare could be. Much less exciting to spill the name of your crush than to actually call him on the phone and tell him you like him (with an audience of slumber party-ers, hyped up on soda in the middle of the night). I may have opted for telling the Truth more often than I took a Dare, but that was then. This is now.

Just as my friends found it more exciting to watch each other DO SOMETHING than to listen to one another SAY SOMETHING, I find myself a forty-something who is tired of listening to a version of the Truth that is nothing more than what you think I want to hear.

There are so very many words, and they are so very easily tuned out, that what I am looking for these days are men and women who are all about the Dare! The DOING! Action and momentum and energy and Word-become-flesh! Truth isn’t found in what you say when you’re put on the spot and have to spit out an answer. Truth is found when you and I Dare to live as if that Truth matters too much to keep it locked away in our words.

Truth is found when we Dare to act in situations where others won’t.

Truth is found when we set aside our need to look good in front of people and choose to do the right thing, unpopular or embarrassing as it may be.

I’m discovering that Truth is actually found in what we Dare to do each day, and that the Dare really is a better choice when what we Dare to do is forget ourselves and live for others.